One year later, what are some signs of progress in Haiti since the earthquake?

Publication Date: 
January 06, 2011

Students and teachers have returned to class:

  • More than 23,000 students and 1,200 teachers have returned to classes at 10 Salesian Missions educational works.
  • To date, students and teachers have returned to the following locations at Salesian Missions schools: Cité Soleil, Cap-Haïtien, Fort-Liberté, Cayes, Gressier, Pétion-Ville, OPEPB (Little Schools), Gonaïves, Thorland and Fleuriot.

Skilled laborers have been prepared for hard work necessary to rebuild Haiti:

  • Salesian Missions alumni have been hired to contribute to the reconstruction process.
  • For long-term efforts, students are studying in specific trades—including: agriculture, nursing, woodworking, mechanics and masonry, as well as learning skills in electricity, air conditioning and welding.

Youth in Haiti are being given hope and opportunity learning trade skills at Salesian Missions educational works:

  • Lessons are being taught on the grounds where the National School of Arts & Trades (ENAM) once stood. Daily classes are being now held in pre-fabricated buildings.
  • Classes for young women include nursing, dressmaking, hair styling and nail care.
  • Older youth in trade schools are using their carpentry skills by making desks for classrooms.
  • Students in Salesian tailoring programs are making school uniforms for other children.
  • The Salesian University Network computer system is in development to create 13 sites to help university students who have been unable to return to school.
  • To date, approximately $2.5 million in funds have been spent by Salesian Missions on relief efforts for the Haitian people, along with additional in-kind donations.

Hungry children are being fed:

  • At Salesian Mission schools in Haiti, feeding programs are in operation and supporting efforts to rebuild the community. Thousands of children receive daily breakfast of a cup of milk and bread.
  • A new kitchen is under construction which will provide food for the children from the schools in Cité Soleil and La Saline, the poorest districts in the area.
  • 59 containers of relief supplies—including food, water, clothing, medical supplies, computers, religious goods, personal hygiene supplies, water purification plants, water purification tablets, 1600 schools in a box, 10 industrial generators, and forklifts—were shipped, as well as two school buses and nearly 2,000 tents. To ensure the most effective use of supplies, Salesian Missions evaluates the situation at each of its sites to match needs with available resources.

Salesian Missions reports that schools are being rebuilt:

  • Students and teachers of the “Little Schools” are installing prefabricated buildings for themselves and other students.
  • New nursing and agriculture school projects are moving forward.
  • Construction continues for primary schools and high schools.
  • To date, approximately $2.5 million in funds have been spent by Salesian Missions on relief efforts for the Haitian people, along with additional in-kind donations.

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